Tips On How To Take Care Of Your Steel Toe Work Boots

If you have a pair of steel toe work boots, you are aware that the boots don’t come cheap. Due to this, you need to take good care of them to avoid incurring huge expenses running to the store now and then. To help you out, here are tips on how to take care of your steel toe boots:

Clean the work boots

This is probably the most basic thing that you can do to your work boots. By cleaning the boots you not only leave your shoes looking clean, but you also protect them from damage. As you might be aware, dirt serves as a bleeding ground for bacteria that might be harmful to your boots. By getting rid of the dirt, you get rid of the bleeding ground thus the boots last for a long time.

Alternate the boots

Another thing you need to do is alternate the work boots. This calls for you to avoid wearing the same pair of boots every day. While the shoes are costly, you should buy at least two pairs. Just like other units, when you don’t use the shoes daily, you give them a long lifespan as they aren’t exposed to the harsh elements every day.

Don’t alter the shoes

Some people make the mistake of modifying the boots so that they can fit their intended look, but this shouldn’t be you. You should avoid adding vent holes, orthopedic inserts, mechanical stretching and other elements to the boots. While you might get the look that you want by altering the shoes, in most cases you create fault lines that weaken the boots.

To be on the safe side, you should leave the boots in their initial look. If you want a customized look, there are some companies that can do it for you without compromising on the quality.

Store the boots properly

At the end of the work day, you should clean and store the boots. How you store the shoes has a great impact on how long they last. As rule of thumb, never put them in wet environments as you will damage the leather. You also should avoid storing them in areas with insects. The best place to store them is in a cool, dry place.

Conclusion

These are some of the ways of properly maintaining the work boots. For the boots to last for a long time, ensure that they are of high quality when buying them.

Passion and Business

Every business person will experience challenges. This is a default setting in life – Challenges will always come. But, what separates the businesses that rise and rise, from those that experience failure after failure?

(Caveat: This is not to say that there are businesses that never fail. ALL businesses fail at some point. Some, however, rise from ashes and shine through.)

Passion, then, is the key ingredient between throwing in the towel, or getting up to fight the next round. There is a refining moment where every business owner goes through intense heat. This heat can either polish you or finish you completely but it all depends on the level of passion in the business.

To always keep your goals ahead of you is tough when everything is bursting at the seams. This is why asking questions is a survival skill.

“Why am I doing this? What works? What doesn’t? What can I do better?”

These questions tackle the level of passion you are carrying for the business. Sometimes, answering these questions may make you revisit exactly how you ended up in that business. This in turn focuses on your motivators. They are the little coals that keep your passion alive. They make going through the grime seem worthwhile even though the outlook seems bleak. As long as you keep asking these questions, you automatically take your mind to your motivators. That’s why challenges really should never worry you, but dwindling passion should ring alarm bells!

So, when passion starts to dwindle, simply repeat the questions, “Why am I doing this? What works? What doesn’t work? What can I do better?”

Once you have your mind on your motivators, the dying passion will be revived once again.

Why am I doing this? It’s the path towards achieving goal X, Y, Z…

What works? So far, what have I achieved? Am I still on my way there?

What doesn’t work? What has derailed me on this course? Is what I’m doing still viable? If I change course, what will still take me to goal X, Y, Z…?

What can I do better? What hasn’t stalled but isn’t performing well either? How can I affect the rate of growth? Do I really need more money? Can I do it differently? Can I borrow a strategy? Who has done this and it’s working for them?

You Don’t Own Your Employee’s Social Media Accounts

Recently, I’ve noticed more and more that small businesses and groups are “asking” their employees to change their cover or profile photos to the brand of the organization where they work. And, while some managers understand that this is a fine line, others have pressured their teams to help them promote the brand of the group.

You know how that happens, don’t you?

First, a request is giving by the manager of the team that goes something like this: “Hey, wouldn’t it be great if we helped promote our business and all of us changed our cover photos to the brand’s image? I just so happen to have some artwork we made up and it would be terrific if each of you went ahead and uploaded it on your social media accounts. It’s a team effort! You don’t have to do it, but… ”

And then you have the first person on the team who goes ahead and changes their profile photo or cover, and next thing you hear is the manager making it a distinct point to acknowledge that team member. I’ve even seen some situations where managers have repeatedly asked, always qualifying it by saying it’s not “required,” to see if a team member who hasn’t changed their private social media settings intends to do it. You know, not so subtle pressure.

Here’s my suggestion to you if you’re a leader or manager of a team and would like to have a little esprit de corps for the team.

Ask once and once only and provide the artwork, if any team member ever wants to help your group get the word out.
Or, you can do what I do and not ask at all. Period.

Candidly, my marketing team has said to me, “Wayne, let’s ask the team to promote one of our social enterprises or companies on social media!”

I’ve never warmed up to the idea, and am not sure I ever will.

I think that we should have a separation between work and personal, as much as we can. I know that some people think that it’s “old school” but the reality is that as a leader I understand that if my team has a personal life and the business world does not encroach into it all of the time, they will be happier, and the productivity will be higher.

There are also some practical and not to mention legal reasons for not asking your team to promote your business or group on social media. It’s particularly true when managers are asking them with the “subtle” pressures that can sometimes happen when they want their team members to support the organization.

Employers have a right to ask their employees not to be on their personal social media accounts during work hours. That’s a legitimate request to make of employees (but not contract workers, freelancers or consultants who are not salaried staff).
Can you require–even subtly–to have your employees support your organization? The short answer is NO. Don’t do it. Social media accounts are the personal and private property of the owners, in this instance, each of your employees. So, just like you can’t require them to give you the keys to their homes, you can’t ask (read, “expect”) them to promote the business on their accounts.

But, what if you want to make it at least an option for your team to promote your business or group on their social media accounts if they so choose. Yes, you can make social media art and images available to them, let them know it’s a resource for them if they ever would like to use it on their accounts, but that’s it. In some instances, you may even be placing yourself or employee in legal jeopardy because promoting your business on their social media accounts for commercial gain can violate social media terms.

The bottom line in the age of social media is that if you want to build team spirit or have an amazing product launch and you want your team involved, you can provide the resources. But you cannot require or pressure them, or do anything other than allow it to each person to do whatever he or she would like to do, if anything, on their personal social media accounts.